Monitoring and Quantifying the Passive Transport of Molecules Through Patch–Clamp Suspended Real and Model Cell Membranes

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Transport of active molecules across biological membranes is a central issue for the success of many pharmaceutical strategies. Herein, we combine the patch-clamp principle with amperometric detection for monitoring fluxes of redox-tagged molecular species across a suspended membrane patched from a macrophage. Solvent- and protein-free lipid bilayers (DPhPC, DOPC, DOPG) patched from single-wall GUV have been thoroughly investigated and the corresponding fluxes measurements quantified. The quality of the patches and their proper sealing were successfully characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

This procedure appears versatile and perfectly adequate to allow the investigation of transport and quantification of the transport properties through direct measurement of the coefficients of partition and diffusion of the compound in the membrane, thus offering insight on such important biological and pharmacological issues.

Résumé: 

Transport of active molecules across biological membranes is a central issue for the success of many pharmaceutical strategies. Herein, we combine the patch-clamp principle with amperometric detection for monitoring fluxes of redox-tagged molecular species across a suspended membrane patched from a macrophage.

Equipe de rattachement 8640: 
Électrochimie
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Monitoring and Quantifying the Passive Transport of Molecules Through Patch–Clamp Suspended Real and Model Cell Membranes

Pierluca Messina, Frédéric Lemaître, François Huet, Kieu An Ngo, Vincent Vivier, Eric Labbé, Olivier Buriez, and Christian Amatore

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 3192 –3196

DOI : 10.1002/anie.201308990